brokenglassIn the United States, [pornography] is an $8-billion trade in sexual exploitation.
It is women turned into subhumans, beaver, pussy, body parts, genitals exposed, buttocks, breasts, mouths open and throats penetrated, covered in semen, pissed on, shitted on, hung from light fixtures, tortured, maimed, bleeding, disemboweled, killed.
It is some creature called female, used.
It is scissors poised at the vagina and objects stuck in it, a smile on the woman’s face, her tongue hanging out.
It is a woman being fucked by dogs, horses, snakes.
It is every torture in every prison cell in the world, done to women and sold as sexual entertainment.
It is rape and gang rape and anal rape and throat rape: and it is the woman raped, asking for more.
It is the woman in the picture to whom it is really happening and the women against whom the picture is used, to make them do what the woman in the picture is doing.
It is the power men have over women turned into sexual acts men do to women, because pornography is the power and the act.
It is the conditioning of erection and orgasm in men to the powerlessness of women: our inferiority, humiliation, pain, torment; to us as objects, things, commodities for use in sex as servants.
It sexualizes inequality and in doing so creates discrimination as a sex-based practice.
It permeates the political condition of women in society by being the substance of our inequality, however located – in jobs, in education, in marriage, in life.
It is women, kept a sexual underclass, kept available for rape and battery and incest and prostitution.
It is what we are under male domination; it is what we are for under male domination.

                                                                                                                    -Andrea Dworkin, Against the Male Flood: Censorship, Pornography, and Equality, 1985
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